Posts Tagged: Women in Science History Challenge

Hidden Figures
by Margot Lee Shetterly

April 18, 2017 Book Reviews, Books 0

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly | September 2016 | William Morrow | Paperback $15.99

Set against the backdrop of the Jim Crow South and the civil rights movement, this is the never-before-told true story of NASA’s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in America’s space program — and whose contributions have been unheralded, until now.

Whew, where to start with this one?

Also: What can I say that hasn’t already been said?

In that spirit, I’ll just say a little about why I read Hidden Figures, and why I think you ought to, too.

This book was gifted to me this past Christmas, but I didn’t end up reading it until just last month — and I “read” most of it via audiobook on my drives to/from work, at that. (Shout out to the public library for the freebie!)

I’m so, so glad that I chose to read this work for the Women in Science History event. I never did get around to my second selection for it, but it doesn’t matter too much because this one was so incredibly good.

It’s so hard to imagine what these women had to overcome to do the incredible work that they rarely even get credit for. To be a woman AND African-American in the sciences in early-mid 2oth century was no picnic in the park, that’s for dang sure.

I haven’t seen the associated movie, but whether you have or haven’t I’d say this book is worth reading in and of itself. Shetterly covers a lot of historical/cultural context that I don’t think could even be translated onto film very well. That’s not to say that this is a particularly “academic” text — it’s got a quite engaging narrative style — but I don’t think the movie could really serve as a replacement for it on the whole.

Have you read this book? And/or do you have any recommendations for me on similar topics?


Links:


Publication information: Shetterly, Margot Lee. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. New York: William Morrow, 2016. Print.
Source: Public library.
Disclaimer: I am not compensated, monetarily or otherwise, for reviews of books or other products.

 

This book was read for the 2017 Women in Science History event, hosted at Doing Dewey.


Women in Science History Event 2017

March 3, 2017 Books 2

I’m excited to sign up for Doing Dewey’s Women in Science History reading event this month!

Here are the details; head over to Doing Dewey (link above) for more info or to sign up:

All you have to do to join in, is link-up one review of a book about a female scientist. You can read nonfiction or historical fiction for the challenge as long as the book you pick features a non-fictional female scientist. I’ll post a link-up for your reviews every Friday and my goal is to also post a book review each week as well. If you want to join in, check out my suggested reads[…]

I just borrowed the audiobook of Hidden Figures from the library to listen to during my commute, and I also got a copy of Lab Girl for this past Christmas so maybe I’ll be able to squeeze that one is as well. (No promises — this is going to be a busy month.)

Last year I read Jane Goodall’s book In the Shadow of Man for this event; check out my review here.

Will you be participating — and if so, what do you plan to read?


In the Shadow of Man
by Jane Goodall

March 26, 2016 Book Reviews, Books 0

Goodall_IntheShadowofMan

★★★★★

In the Shadow of Man by Jane Goodall | This edition April 2010, originally published January 1971 | Mariner Books | Paperback $15.95

World-renowned primatologist, conservationist, and humanitarian Dr. Jane Goodall’s account of her life among the wild chimpanzees of Gombe is one of the most enthralling stories of animal behavior ever written. Her adventure began when the famous anthropologist Dr. Louis Leakey suggested that a long-term study of chimpanzees in the wild might shed light on the behavior of our closest living relatives. As she came to know the chimps as individuals, she began to understand their complicated social hierarchy and observed many extraordinary behaviors, which have forever changed our understanding of the profound connection between humans and chimpanzees.

In the Shadow of Man is a classic in the realm of science non-fiction for good reason. Jane Goodall and her fellow researchers spent years — well, decades actually — studying the chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream area near Kigoma, Tanzania. She not only observed an astounding range of wild chimp behaviors, but she brought the plight of these chimps (whose forest home and own bodies were/are endangered by humans) into the spotlight for the rest of the world.

This book was originally published in the early 1970’s, well before the author observed some of the more violent chimp behaviors like “war” and infant cannibalism. However, it was revolutionary at the time because it sort of humanized chimps and debunked some misconceptions about the nature of their primitive tool use or their typical diets.

(One thing to keep in mind if you decide to read this as well — it’s fairly apparent in a few instances that this was written in the 1970’s, when the general attitude of Westerners towards the native peoples of Africa was still slightly colonialist, or at least more openly superior than is generally accepted nowadays.)

Goodall and her team gradually came to know the apes as individuals, with particular personality traits as well as physical features. She was particularly fond of a few of them, which made it all that much more difficult to deal with leaving them to go back to Europe, or watching them suffer or die. The section on the polio epidemic was particularly brutal, as by that point in the book I was also beginning to feel as though I “knew” the chimps and care about their fates. However, even that section was incredibly interesting, because I had no idea that a disease like polio could cross the species boundary. It makes sense now that I think about it, though, because after all we are so closely related genetically to these particular apes.

Jane Goodall has written several follow-up books about the chimps, as well as several other books on topics like spirituality and environmentalism. I read her book Reason for Hope, about how her spiritual beliefs have developed with her experiences and scientific studies, last year. She has a way of writing that makes you feel as though you’re have a thoughtful but laid-back conversation with a good friend. You know that feeling you got when you watched Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood as a little kid, as though this intelligent but kind man was speaking to you personally about something that really mattered? It’s a bit like that, but for grown-ups and involving chimpanzees.

I’m so glad I chose to read this because I feel like I learned quite a bit + it made me hungry for more information about chimpanzees and east African wildlife in particular. I’ll have to see if I can pick up any of Goodall’s follow-up books at the library sometime soon.


Links:

This book also counts for my Classics Club challenge and Women in Science History Challenges.


Publication information: Goodall, Jane. In the Shadow of Man. New York: Mariner Books. Print.
Source: Barnes & Noble
Disclaimer: I am not compensated, monetarily or otherwise, for reviews of books or other products.


Women in Science History Challenge

March 4, 2016 Books 0

WomenScienceHistoryChallenge2016

I’ve decided to follow the lead of Katie over at Doing Dewey and join up with the Women in Science History Challenge!

The goal is to, well, read about women in science history of course! This is a topic close to my own heart. Hit that banner up there for a link to the sign-up page.

I’ve been meaning to read Jane Goodall’s In the Shadow of Man, her 1971 book about her experiences observing wild chimpanzees in Tanzania. It’s on my Classics Club list, plus it counts towards this year’s Women’s Classic Literature Event. Perhaps I’ll pick up a copy at the library, or maybe I’ll just buy myself an early birthday present….

I encourage anyone with an interest in science or women’s history to join up, too. The more, the merrier.